Essential ingredient spotlight

Hello and thanks for tuning into our first article of essential ingredient spotlight: a new series where we highlight the health benefits of our plant-derived oils.

This week, we’re focusing on the basics. Many of you who are new might have questions about aromatherapy so we’re glad to give you some helpful tips. 

Firstly, why aromatherapy? Aromatherapy has been used for hundreds of years, especially in East Asia and parts of Africa for healing purposes. Certain herbal scents are said to relieve physical and emotional maladies. It was thought that when you inhale essential oils, the scent travels from the olfactory (smell) nerves in your nose directly to the brain. The olfactory system is very unique in regards to how it sends information to the brain from the nose. It is directly linked and intertwined with the limbic system which is responsible for processing emotions and memory, and can impact mood and behavior. Smell is often considered the most significant trigger of memory, compared to the other senses. Scents and smells can be used to our advantage since they can have a direct impact on the nervous system and the biochemistry involved in the sympathetic (fight or flight) and parasympathetic (rest and digest) responses. 

Aromatherapy can be an excellent strategy to promote and create positive smell/scent memories for the brain and to support attention to tasks. The use of essential sprays for topical application can serve the body well and help induce a sense of calm. Sprays are an effective way for reaping the health benefits of the oils. Our natural essential oils are infused into a spring water base which makes them perfectly diluted and safe for the skin. Essential oils are very concentrated substances and applying too much onto the skin without the aid of a carrier oil or water base can cause irritation and overwhelm the skin. We always recommend you try an essential spray first if you are new to the world of aromatherapy. When applying, mist above and around your face and shoulders or directly on your body, breathe in deeply, and exhale.  

Rosemary

rosemary

Rosmarinus Officinalis, or Rosemary, is an herbal staple in almost every kitchen that has a citrus-like, herbaceous scent and belongs to the mint family. It can boost mental activity, stimulate the appetite, relieve fatigue, relieve stress, enhance concentration, and support respiratory function. Rosemary oil consists of chemical components, 1,8 Cineole and alpha pinene, which are generally known for their renewing properties. Its chemical backbone makes rosemary a powerful antiseptic and repellant of insects. Chemicals pinene and camphor are especially helpful in aiding in rosemary’s natural insect repelling property. 

Frankincense

Frankincese

The English word frankincense derives from the Old French expression franc encens, meaning "high-quality incense". The word franc in Old French meant "noble" or "pure. Frankincense is a resin and has a sweet and woody aroma, which can act as a sedative and enhance mood by diminishing feelings of stress and anxiety. Its main chemical components are monoterpenes, limonene, a-pinene, and a-thujene. When combined, these monoterpenes contribute to frankincense's aromatic benefits of calm and relaxation. More recently it has been proven to possess antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. Frankincense smells balsamic-spicy-sweet, with a slightly lemon-like fragrance of incense and a conifer-like undertone.

Eucalyptus

eucalyptus

Eucalyptus is antibacterial, anti-microbial, antiseptic, and stimulating. It helps relieve mental exhaustion by boosting circulation to the brain, sinus congestion, and eliminate harmful airborne bacteria. The main chemical components of eucalyptus oil, eucalyptol and alpha-terpineol, give the oil a soothing, cooling vapor. According to a study, Eucalyptol reduces inflammation and pain when applied topically making it a perfect and refreshing addition to any aromatherapeutic essential spray. 

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Many things are good, 

many are important,

but only a few are essential. 

D. Todd Christofferson